Take Action Guide

Take Action Guide

Thanks for watching the film and taking the pledge!

We put together this interactive guide with Seafood Watch, CUESA and Local Catch to highlight sustainable seafood solutions. As seafood “eaters” we can vote for local, sustainable seafood every time we choose to buy (or not buy) seafood at our favorite markets, restaurants and grocery stores.

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1. Eat smaller fish and shellfish.

Eating small fish, and shellfish like oysters, mussels and clams is a good choice because they are plentiful, can rebound quickly from fishing pressures, and are low in bio-accumulated contaminants like mercury. When we eat lower on the food chain, we have a lesser impact on the biodiversity of the ocean.

Resources:

hogisland-sign Hog Island Oyster Company grows oysters, mussels and clams in Tomales Bay, CA and Discovery Bay, WA. They have a passion for oysters and practicing sustainable aquaculture techniques.
Visit the Website
seafood-search Use the online search tool by Seafood Watch to research your favorite seafood and find healthy, sustainable options..
Use the Search Tool

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2. Enjoy seafood in season.

Seafood is seasonal, just like produce. American fisheries are managed according to each species’ lifecycle, and fishing is often only permitted during specific months, based on ocean conditions and the health of each wild stock. When you buy seafood seasonally, you can often find it from local sources, and before it has been frozen – and experience peak quality and flavor.

Resources:

localcatch Find a farmer’s market that sells fresh, local seafood near you.
Find Local Seafood
tataki-sushi Tataki Sushi Bar is a pioneer in the sustainable sushi movement. They source their fish using the Seafood Watch guide and advocate for responsible seafood sourcing in the restaurant community.
Watch the Video
Visit the Website
View the Chart Learn about which locally caught seafood is in season in the San Francisco Bay Area using CUESA’s Seafood Availability Chart
View the Chart

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3. Buy locally-caught and processed.

When you buy locally-caught and processed seafood, you’re supporting local fishermen, and the healthy management of local resources. When we know where we’re eating from, we are far more connected with our local waters and the issues that affect them. Community Supported Fishery (CSF) programs like Real Good Fish find local, sustainable seafood, organize logistics with fishermen, and bring fresh local seafood right to you.

Resources:

realgood Learn more about Real Good Fish and join their CSF program for local seafood in the San Francisco Bay Area.
Visit the Website
localcatch Use Local Catch to find the best places nearby to get fresh, local seafood directly from the source. On their website, you can search for CSF programs, dock pickup opportunities or farmers markets near you.
Find Local Seafood

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4. Check the Seafood Watch guide.

Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Seafood Watch program can help you navigate the often-complicated task of identifying which kinds of seafood are good choices, and which aren’t. Next time you go to the grocery store, market or out for a seafood dinner, bring their app or a printable guide along.

Resources:

Seafood Watch Guide Download a printable Seafood Watch guide to reference when you buy seafood or eat at restaurants.
Download the Guide
sw-app-hand Download the Seafood Watch App to reference when you buy seafood or eat at restaurants.
Get the app

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5. Ask questions.

When we ask grocery stores, fish markets and restaurant waiters questions about where fish comes from, how and where it was caught, we’re demanding a traceable seafood system. Know what questions are important to ask, and avoid buying/eating their seafood when the answers are unknown. We can influence seafood traceability by asking more questions.

Resources:

checklist Learn what questions to ask with our downloadable checklist
(Coming Soon!)

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Thanks for taking action! To become more involved and spread the word about seafood sustainability and supporting small, local fishermen, consider hosting an OF THE SEA screening in your community or school.